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board of education policy discussion. tonight we'd like to report on the pack's upcoming community briefing on the redesign of special education services. next week we will be hosting a community brief inging on the redesign of these services. this briefing will help us gain a better understanding of the bigger picture and perhaps some of the challenges related to implementing practices across the district. as the para dime increases, parents and community partners alike have many questions about implementations of this change. -- including the san francisco youth commission, the united educators of san francisco and support for families of disabilities. many questions are related to the /tkhreufr delivery of a more inclusive model to address these students' needs. at the last board of education meeting on tuesday, february 26, it was decided that 33 probationary teachers would be non reelected to the classroom for next year. what was particularly notable about this decision was the fact that 11 of these 33 teachers were special education teachers, position that are hard to sta
of the educational system. this is half an hour. >> great to see people out tonight doing amazing work for kids in new orleans and thank you for coming. just going to talk for 10 or 15 minutes and take questions. some people here tonight in the book and willing to answer your questions during that session if you are interested in hearing about what it was like to be part of that process from their vantage point. the other day i was finishing reading journalist catherine booth's book called behind a beautiful forevers which tells the story of a group of families living in a slum and in her author's notes she tries to explain why she chose to focus on ordinary people rather than broader policy debate for history and she wrote something that summarizes what i had hoped to do in "hope against hope: 3 schools, 1 city, and the struggle to educate america's children" better than i ever could. she rose when i settled into a place, listening and watching i don't try to fool myself that stories of individuals i themselves arguments. i just believe better arguments, better policies that formulated what i
education students. so i just wan if -- want to reiterate that the funds are going to general education, not special education. >> do you have a [inaudible] question about the dollar amount is? . it translates roughly into 1.8 million. the state does provide us with technical assistance through the process [inaudible] have been attending since september. once the plan is approved, rather than general education [inaudible] will be participating in this process as well. we have been having -- we were required to put together a stake holder group and also a leadership group which is really just a [inaudible] is to meet regularly to help us through the process from beginning to end and that has been happening since september in october we brought on dan, the author of one or our review checklist that we used for our [inaudible] to consult with us for analyzing the root cause for [inaudible] and in october we also brought on board doctor brown who is here with us today as a consultant of the safe plan. doctor brown is a member of the state [inaudible] that works on significant disproporti
system, recounts her career and present her thoughts on education reform. this event is about 45 minutes. thank you very much for joining us. i know you have a couple of busy days from last evening. jon stewart to this evening, cnn, piers morgan and would like to have our old friends here from c-span filming this event that many people across the united states can really benefit from a lot of what michelle has to say. just to kickstart it deceiving, how did you come up with a fascinating and interesting book, "radical," and where did this interesting income from? >> so i think the genesis of the name is an interesting one in that when it first got to d.c. it was the lowest performing and most dysfunctional school district and the entire nation. that was a pretty widely known truth. so i started doing things that were obvious for school district in that kind of state. i started closing low performing schools, moving out ineffective employees, cutting the central office bloated bureaucracy and have. as i was taking all these steps and measures, people started saying she's a firebrand, she'
so i am able to monitor the education my children have been receiving. when sitting in her class i notice how she engages students. she is energetic and [inaudible]. these qualities we should look for in all educational professionals. it is unclear to me why someone of her ability will not be reelected to teach next year. she's the kind of teacher that students will remember when they look back at their education. please reconsider this decision as i am looking forward to having my son in her class. it is teachers like her that restore faith in the public school system. most sincerely, glenda [inaudible]. >> good evening president norton and commissioners and everyone. [inaudible]. i hope i said that right. my name is christina [inaudible]. i am one of the non reelected teachers. i teach fourth grade at [inaudible] elementary. i'm here for two things. one is to introduce myself and the second is to ask you to help our community come up with a solution to this situation. i will call it in the most neutral /serpl situation. i humbly and respectfully bring before you 15 y
treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable behavior, and i am often fearful when we try to develop a black letter law if you have all these factors and bullying and you fell outside and that works okay in the courtroom. right? as prosecutors we need clear understanding of the laws to understand whether we have a criminal violation or not, but i am fearful we maybe overly legalistic and the way we deal with on a daily basis and we need to approach this by a global perspective respecting people and understanding we have the same rights and obligations and starting with the adults and i go back to the adults because the adults really have to tow the line here. they really have to walk the talk. i cannot tell you how often i of involved in large mentoring efforts and now in two different places, in l.a. and arizona. i cannot tell you how often the teachers are the ones that set the tone whether we have a respectable environment or and
the conversation /tw with the department of justice and department of education so that perhaps some soft guidance and oversite that we've had in the past which has been very compliance is now shifting to what's better for english learners and that is coming from the work that the practitioners are doing. what is good practice. we have data now that we can show what we need to do increase the academic of our el's. this is gonna really give us some good information about how to move forward. so i wanna thank the team again for bringing the information forward. >> thank you very much. i neglected to call for public comment on this but there's nobody to signed up. so we are going to move on to our second presentation on item m. >> thank you president norton. again a very timely and important topic and i'd like to ask doctor blanco and her team to come forward and take us through this presentation. move to extend the meeting. >> second motion we hear a motion here today to provide you with an update. this is the district's plan that will be implemented pending approval on addressing the disprop
towards the third world nation. >> when you look at the direct investment in education in how that impacts gdp, how it impacts employment, how it impacts earnings, and the research is pretty compelling that it is clear that investing in education is critical. we have no choice. >> my question is, again, i am going back -- is there some way we can have sequestration under the circumstances we have the right now that you can avoid the cuts in these areas? i just want to know. the implication is that maybe the administration is trying to zero in on things a bit the headlines or whatever. i am just trying to figure out how strict this situation is. but simply put, that is where the money is. the money is in these programs. there are no alternatives. >> am i pronouncing your name right? i am sorry. >> yes, sir. i would agree that sequestration is an across-the- board approach to cutting, it will leave many things and funded, even things you don't want. since title one and special lead and those moneys, where the bulk of the department's moneys, that is where you will see the cuts. i think a bet
. >> this kills me. >> why it's hard to fight the education block. that's our show, tonight. >> and now, john stossel. john: schools are lousy. what would you do part of the government's monopoly? one school chancellor fired under performing teachers. that made teachers mad. >> she's misled, misguided, and doing that to other people. >> she's not trained, doesn't know what real teaching is. john: what a terrible choice to lead schools and called the hatchet lady. "time" made her look like a witch. who is this awful person? let's ask her. michelle rhe, joins us from california. you made people mad. >> yes, i did. >> you fired 36 principals, 200 some teachers, closed school, and eventually pushed out in washington, d.c.. >> yeah. well, remember, that when i took over the district, it was the lowest performing and most distucksal district in the entire country. what i did were things i thought were obvious, close low performing failing schools failing children for decades. i'm going to fire ineffective employees, pay the effective ones more money, cut a central office bureaucracy out of control
that we have a lot of educating to do. in my office we do a lot of cyber bullying training in our schools and it's amazing how much access some kids have to the internet at a really young age. they have iphones. they're on the internet. they have or smartphones. they have computers in the bedroom and parent it is never over the shoulder to see what is going online. there is a lot of unrestricted access to the internet and the internet has put it on another level and one push of a button and everybody in the school will have a picture or hear it and the outcome of that is -- it would be not just reconciling relationships or restorative justice or some other way between two or three or four people but now you have a whole study body that has been tempered or tainted with something that goes against the individual who was a target of that, so the internet working more strongly with the partners and the providers of the internet and there is awareness and education, but back to the student assemblies that we do it is amazing at the end of the assemblies how many kids will step forward qu
of the 33 teachers who are up for non reelection. i teach [inaudible] elementary special education third, fourth and fifth for children with emotional and learning disabilities. i would like to read a letter that one of my parents wrote to both superintendent [inaudible] as well as miss norton. he wanted to be here in attendance tonight but his wife is having a baby so he couldn't be here and i made copies so -- to whom it may concern. i am the parent of a child who currently attends leonard [inaudible] elementary school. i have recently been informed that or beloved will not be returning to the school next year. i would like to express how concerned and saddened i am to learn this. i cannot express how devoted miss coalman has been with our child. our child has been diagnosed with adhd, a disorder that hinders his ability to benefit from the education he receives at school. this condition requires patience and understand inging from teachers that work with him. i can't tell you how frustrating the past few years have been in maintaining -- when miss coleman was introduced to ou
roots of rome. representation there is felt as well. also a man of jesuit education. that historic that this is the first time that they have had a pope selected that was of a jesuit background. tell us about that. >> disciplinarian. very, he is a well-studied man. there hasn't been a pope outside of europe in 1,000 years. think of that. latin america with all of its people, who were so faithful to the catholic church, dwindling numbers across europe. dwindling numbers in north america, now latin america. the pope hails from there. there were a lot of tears tonight in st. peters square. it saw interviews on italian networks and beyond with people from argentina who said we are here just because we happen to be in rome. we are catholic and we wanted to come see. it saw a young woman say but i never even had any dreams it would be our pope. our humble man. our 76-year-old. who so many of them seem to know. rode the bus and made his own food and really was one with the fold. a new direction. it certainly seems like that. more than anything. great hope of the catholic church. >> kimber
deescalation techniques. training or school psychologists in central office, /perbl education in behavior support plans, how to formulate them and implement them effectively, adopting data systems or updating our data systems particular write with review to day that and discipline. and then looking at this data [inaudible] on a regular basis to drive our decision making. and finally of course educating parents on what is available to them and what niche tiff and interventions are being implemented ed district wide that they can [inaudible]. this provides an operationalized chart and we recommended -- we already had in anticipation of this, unfortunately we were found to be disproportional last yore and in an attempt to address that we had started an initiative of the rbi behavior [inaudible] and we are looking at more specificically using that particularly to address the needs at our high school level. looking at social and emotional curriculum being made available to all our sites to implement at the k 8 level providing sites with behavior coaches, rp coaches, reviewing s
education in california, we are not -- we used to have the best public education system in the country and we've gone from first to worst and it's astonishing, actually, to see how little progress the state has made compared to where other states across the country are that have prioritized this issue. >> so nobody got an a? >> i'm a tough grader. nobody got an a. we had a couple states that had b minuses. a few cs but quite frankly, lots of ds and fs. lots of people came up to me and said, you were so harsh. i said, well, let's look at the situation. this country is 14th, 17th, and 25th internationally on reading, science, and math. 25th in math. i mean, if you look at the countries that are ahead of us in math, hungary, slow vain yeah, liechtstein, and can you imagine if we fell behind in the olympic medal count to a country like hungary, people would be going nuts. but why is it that we can be 25th in math in the globe and nobody really cares. >> florida has a third of the kids that california has in school, 100,000 teachers less but they have a significant latino population. >> tha
disconcerting that these people the departmentut of education. al cÁrdenas was on c-span this morning, talking about how important education was. cpacning to this conference, i am cognizant of the fact that we have people in this country who don't want to see this country succeed. they're not creating jobs, they're talking about people being unemployed, but i don't see their publicans passing any bills or helping the president .ut in any way infrastructure, we are looking like a third world country. i don't understand these republicans. if they love this country so much, i don't understand why they don't want to see as progress. then again, it's all about politics, all about power. ted cruz is dangerous. i'm glad we have a drone program. host: thanks, henry. patricia is on the air. caller: i was impressed, and i have to agree with the school of thought that we need more conservative candidates. listening to the people who keep picking the losers is not a winning strategy. and coulter, sarah palin, beautiful, funny, witty -- how come the conservative women are so much better looking than those
. and regarding high school graduates, you have to hear this. our education system is failing our education system is failing our kids coming up n at a dry cleaner, our education system is failing our kids coming up n we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. gerri: sometimes there is one number that describes everything you need to know about a topic. we have one of those today, and it has to do with education. if you want to understand the state of education in this country, with the defense. nearly 80% of new york city high school graduates have trouble with basic skills like reading and writing and math. the vast majority don't have the basic skills you would expect of a half their age. thehocking news was reported by a lot untried local cbs affiliate today, saying that 11,000 kids have graduated from the city's high school and needed remedial courses to relearn the basics before entering new york's community colle
was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introducti
, developing an education code for the 13, 14 school year. we have provided cpi training that focuses on verbal deescalation techniques already, but we will look to continue that through next year and going forward. [inaudible] support plan training this year and all psychologists and central special education staff were trained and we are looking at how to maintain this going forward for any new staff, perhaps putting in place a trainer and making sure any new staff is trained as well. recommendations around data systems -- synergy is coming next year and they do have a good discipline model. and they also recommending that we purchase some sort of data system to track students [inaudible] meetings and interventions that have happened prior to students being referred for special education assessment and then hooking further to analyze this data on a regular basis. we've put this all together in a plan that has been submitted to cde and we are referring to it as a draft because we have to wait approval from them before we can go forward and we are hoping that we get their approval
the country. because the data shared by our u.s. attorney, representatives from the department of education confirm if we don't do anything about it, 13 million kids will become victims again for another year. some 3 million kids across the country will decide it is better to leave their school grounds than to continue their education. there will be more stupblting of the emotional and educational growth of our kids. all across the bay, whether working here in san francisco or alameda or sonoma or santa clara county. i want to thank you law enforcement officials here, instructors, community advocates, people who are concerned about our kids, they are our future and i would love to see a new generation of kids who don't know what bully is, who are not victims, who don't have those scars. but we've got to do today is sharing in the best practices, to be encouraged by programs like our roof top school here in san francisco who has traded a 50-person ambassador class that will talk about this, that will invite other kids, school administrators who have received the support of our school site
justice and people say "that's san francisco" and we believe that a right to a education is i social justice issue and if you deny that you're denying their civil rights. that's how we feel about being proactive. now there is a line of demarcation happens and we want to be proactive i know jill is looking at me. when the event happens and there is harm that occurs we believe in restorative practices and repairing the harm. we don't believe in kicks kids out of school. that's not a solution. we are an educational institution. we go through this process and the perpetrator understands the damage and make it right to the victim. it's not okay shake hands. it's a whole process. you talk about it and process what is happening and people follow up on that, so we very much believe in this restorative process in san francisco and how do we know? because of the indicators that should be going up are going up and the others are going down. our truancies are down. suspensions are down and students in class is going up. thank you for being here. [applause] >> okay. that's okay. you ju
have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willing it slow down enough to invite kids to sit down at the table with us and partner? do we have the courage to understand that inclusion takes time and we have have to work more diligently to i invite young people, particularly marginaliz
to schools because educators kind of get it. it's not a stretch when we talk to them why it's important to get it, but we want to take the message outside of the school into the media, into the communities, into families so that people kind of understand this process of another way of learning and becoming an educated person. a couple of other things i do i work with anne on the board and with the foundation. that has been exciting. i do advising for sesame street. if you have small children the next seafn sesame street you will see some of the favorite characters and breathing and learning problem solving models and we're very excited -- >> [inaudible] >> and they're focusing on self regulation and other skills and specific focus and exciting working with them the past year and a half or so so i want people to have a look here, and what i would like to do is tie some of the things together that you have been hearing about today and in terms of bullying prevention, other prevention work going on in your state and in terms of promoting positive behaviors with youth, and so sometimes
're getting that kind of education? you're an africana studies. do you feel safe. >> the africana studies and african heritage house, these are places are safe for students. but i agree, there is a different between admitting students of color and retaining them and there has to be considerable effort put in to curriculum workshops for freshman and all students that really puts in and a concentrated effort on educating students on the importance of anti-racism and the privilege and importance of how it works into our campus as a whole and how these issues are not just separate from overland because overland is this school with a great history, a progressive history. it's not an utopia. people who are let in to overland are created and made and in our american society. that's where a lot of these issues are found and oftentimes perpetuated. that's where the issue has to be focused on. within overland but also in the larger american society and what that says where we are as a community of people as a state. >> michael: this conversation, unfortunately, has to end now but i hope and i belie
effort to keep our city beautiful. sparkling and clean and educating youth and provide the scholarships and support for them and using culture -- about the cleanliness of our neighborhoods and respecting our neighborhoods all throughout our city. we are also engaging the bright technological mindsen joining us in s f city and join the chambers in creating jobs and training for those last year, last summer, over 5,005,000 and eight jobs were created for summer for our youth, paying jobs every single one of them and this year we expect to exceed it with your help and the help of other companies here and we need to create hope in every aspect for our youth as mayor khan said they are going to inherit the city and the successes that we are pawk talking about today, they are going to also inherit failure and is we want to have less failures with their invest and investment in them and in companies like sales force zooma and at which timer are all leading the evident with the 1800 other technology companies to help us create this investor confidence that companies are leading they started to
it done. and that brings me arrest warrant why we're here today. a college track and education. i hear from businesses that they're number one priority is education. they would like nothing better to hire san franciscans but they often struggle to find their candidates. and it's clear to me the only way our city will continue to be strong is if we support the improvement of our city schools. in many cities they choose to address the keegs challenges by picking fights and appointing fingers but once again not in 90 san francisco. together we strive for excellence in our public schools not excused. last year, i met with our community leaders the first time in our memories the mayor and others and we all agree that technology, expediting our kids earlier with the expectation for college and seth them to in our economies is the keys key to success and we're making progress. san francisco unified continues to be the hive urban development are high. we've seen double digit high-grades among our latin and africa kids >> results are being recognized for our achievement we received a federal g
had told them so it really is educating our high school counselors, or college and career counselors, our career tech education folks on -- these are viable opportunities for our students and we need to present it to them and find places to expose them to this because 75 percent of engineers say they come from families of engineers and so they need that exposure and we want our students to have that exposure. and that was our only topic and again it was deep and it was interesting and we had lots of different perspectives so again, i wanna thank the leadership for bringing this tommic and inviting the special guests to comment on it as well. >> thank you for that report. commissioner wynn from the budget committee. >> thank you. so we met last week. we mostly just talked about -- our deputy superintendent gave us an estimate that they would be recommending or trying /o -- we would be trying to find in our budget the ability to absorb about half to two-thirds of that so that one-and-a-half or two million dollars that we're adding that to our budget problem which is significant. we
can urriculum that's based on the importance of reading, literacy, education, we have a whole violence prevention can urriculum, we have 22,000 kids playing baseball throughout northern california, junior giants baseball, and we have a number of volunteer coaches and commissioners and one of the things that we ask every year our junior giants players to do is to take the peace pledge. it's basically the pledge is i'm a junior giant, i pledge to strike out violence by, and the first line is prevent bullying and respecting my teammates, coaches, family and friends. so at the peer grass roots level where we have coaches working closely with kids we hope to spread a message, we also have an art contest, imagine peace where we honor kids at a ballgame later in the year just so kids can interpret and show their form of how they interpret anti-bullying and peace in this society. you know, it's not perfect, it doesn't always work. i think sometimes people tune us out. but we feel strongly that with the partnerships that we have in the community we can make an impact and i think there's a bias
twitter so feel free to answer it. if the focus is on education why not focus on fair use and other acceptable uses? i am not sure the contrast that it is making but will you fill out one? >> the essence of the program, the educational part of the program is to educate people on where they can go to get legal content, what they can do to make sure there isn't illegal content, their account is being used to transmit. is not meant to be a course in copyright law. not meant to the copyright 101 and here it exclusive rights and here is a limitation or defense in section 107. is really meant as a program aimed at people using peer to peer, or those who are casual users who want to make sure unauthorized content isn't going over their system, that they know there is a way to avoid that and they can find content legally on surfaces online music matters or netflix or anything like that. >> if i could just disagree with you a little bit my understanding is the center for copyright information does want to be a resource about copyright because part of a problem we identified is people don't u
that has prohibited positive education reform for decades. revitalization is predicated on leadership. the societal problems dragging our country down are not new. they are magnified during economic downturn. as conservatives, we have to lead by example. my mother always told me, you can't stop through legislation. it has to come from the heart. the westery day in virginia legislature to impart the tenets of servitude as him to everyone who has been tasked to lead my great state. you'd be surprised how much have in common with people, even when they're on the other side of the aisle. west virginia is on the verge of greatness, and america can see a rebirth of prosperity. conservatism and these young leaders will lead the way. as i said, my state motto is mountaineers are always free. i believe america should always be free. thank you. >> up next, the auditor of franklin county, ohio. his life and career have been about service to his country and community. he is a veteran of the u.s. army and served with coalition forces that liberated kuwait during the 1991 persian gulf war. .lease w
and local policy makers, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he was there, i know ter ther
urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introduction -- no, i get to say something. i get to say something. as everyone in this room knows, youngest mayor in 100 years, right? youngest mayor in 100 years when he was elected 10 years ago and he has remained an effective and visionary leader for everyone. mayor newsom gained worldwide recognition when he granted marriage licenses to same sex couples in 2004. we all remember those moving pictures of smiling couples on the steps of city hall, some of them their children watching on. his actions in 2004 thrust this civil rights issue into the national
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 965 (some duplicates have been removed)